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Tests

The Catalyst Athlete Scorecard is the best way to objectively measure improvements in fitness for athletes.
Below is the summarized version of our testing procedure. To read the full procedure, you can download the testing booklet below:
10components2015

We’ve broken ‘Fitness’ into its component elements. They are:

  1. Cardiovascular/Respiratory Function – the ability of body systems to gather, process, and deliver oxygen.
  2. Stamina – the ability of body systems to utilize, store, process, and deliver energy.
  3. Strength – the ability of a muscular unit, or group of muscular units, to apply force.
  4. Flexibility – the ability to maximize the range of motion at a given joint.
  5. Power – the ability of a muscular unit, or combination of muscular units, to apply maximum force in minimum time.
  6. Speed – the ability to minimize the time cycle of a repeated movement.
  7. Coordination – the ability to combine several distinct movement patterns into a single movement.
  8. Agility – the ability to minimize transition time from one movement to another.
  9. Balance – the ability to control the placement of the body’s centre of gravity in relation to its support base.
  10. Accuracy – The ability to control movement in a given direction or at a given intensity.

The CAT Scale assigns a value – from 0 to 10 – to each of these Elements, which will give a total of 100 possible points.
Can increased performance in one Element adversely affect performance in another? Of course. The closer you are to specializing in one Element, the more your score in a competing Element will suffer. Remember, our goal is broad-based, general fitness. Specialists in one Element (aka competitive athletes,) won’t train for this type of GPP other than very early in the off-season.
As an example, a huge score in the Strength Test may require bodily changes that negatively affect your Coordination score. To some, that may be perfectly acceptable. But our goal is to present an overall picture of fitness.
Using the CAT Score To Improve at Sport
Many Catalyst clients are competitive athletes. For them, “Fitness” is specific: each Element must optimize their potential without limiting their skill. For example, a hockey player doesn’t need a 300lb clean and jerk, but does need explosive strength. Focusing on the high strength goal carries the cost of missed opportunities elsewhere.
In the off-season, a competitive athlete’s fitness should be broad, general and inclusive. They should play sports other than their “main” sport to avoid burnout and overuse injuries. They should build GPP—work capacity—and immunity to injury. They should balance out joint dominances created by their sport. Rather than booking more ice time in the summer, athletes should play games involving different motor patterns; run, jump, carry, push and lift; and build aerobic endurance and stamina.
Further reading: Fitness Through Sports, by Chris Cooper.
Our role is to build the best possible athlete, then hand them over to a sport-specific coach for skill development. A fatigued athlete can’t improve their skill; we remove the fatigue. Likewise, a weak athlete can’t help their team; we remove weakness.
Measuring the 10 Elements of Fitness
We’ve chosen tests for each of the 10 Elements based on:

  1. Longevity – they’ve been around awhile
  2. Peer-review – they’ve been used and critiqued and argued extensively
  3. Scientific – they’re replicable
  4. Validity – they provide precisely the type of information we require
  5. Simplicity – they can be done with minimal equipment
  6. Rigor – while a novice can perform them, their level of accuracy improves in the hands of a professional.
  7. Relevance – each Element must be challenging even to one specialized in that particular Element.

As an example, Element #1: Cardiovascular/Respiratory function uses the O’Neill Aerobic Test to determine aerobic capacity. We chose the O’Neill Test from literally thousands of tests done with varying pieces of equipment. We picked O’Neill over V02Max testing because of equipment availability and new research questioning the reliability of breath-measuring tests. We chose the ergometer over running for the test because different variables unrelated to aerobic prowess can influence a running test (injury, muscular fatigue, and technique.) The O’Neill Test has been thoroughly validated in the scientific literature, is replicable anywhere, is simple to perform (just go as far as possible in 4:00,) and can be done by anyone, but is more accurate when coached by a professional.
For youth athletes, creating a broad fitness base is especially important. While myths about resistance training persist, every major fitness education body, every governing health agency and every accredited University program now recommends lifting weights for kids. It’s not just safe; it’s necessary for regular bone growth and muscular development, as well as avoidance of diabetes and other diseases.
Further reading: No Squats for the Coal Miner’s Daughter, by Chris Cooper.
It’s easy to fall into mythology. It’s easy to read magazines or websites without thinking critically. But the “easy” way isn’t the optimal way. That’s the Catalyst difference.
Testing Overview

  1. Cardiovascular/Respiratory Function – the ability of body systems to gather, process, and deliver oxygen.

Test: O’Neill 4-Minute Test (Concept II)

  1. Stamina – the ability of body systems to utilize, store, process, and deliver energy.

Test: Tabata Squat and Pushup

  1. Strength – the ability of a muscular unit, or group of muscular units, to apply force.

Test: Crossfit Total

  1. Flexibility – the ability to maximize the range of motion at a given joint.

Tests: Trunk Rotation, 90/90 Hamstrings Test, V-Sit Test, Shoulder Flexibility Test, Posterior Chain Test

  1. Power – the ability of a muscular unit, or combination of muscular units, to apply maximum force in minimum time.

Test: Vertical Jump Test (Sargent Jump)

  1. Speed – the ability to minimize the time cycle of a repeated movement.

Test: 40yd sprint

  1. Coordination – the ability to combine several distinct movement patterns into a single movement.

Test: Skipping.

  1. Agility – the ability to minimize transition time from one movement to another.

Test: Dots Drill.

  1. Balance – the ability to control the placement of the body’s centre of gravity in relation to its support base.

Test: Agility
Test: Sport-specific
Testing Order
Since fatigue from one type of test can influence the score of the next, it’s important to perform the tests in such an order that fatigue is minimized.
During the initial testing period, perform the tests in this order:
Aerobic (O’Neill Test)
Accuracy
Flexibility
Power
Speed
Balance
Agility
Coordination
Stamina
…the Strength test may be performed on a different day, following a general and then specific warm-up, due to the heavy central nervous system taxation on elite clients.
Retesting is done on a test-by-test basis, but never again on the same day. Crossfit will dictate that some tests (stamina, strength) are done on a fairly random basis, but others should be planned for retest based on their typical rate of improvement. For instance, aerobic capacity should be retested after 3 weeks of training, because aerobic capacity is typically improved after that period.
The Tests
Element #1: Cardiovascular/Respiratory Function – the ability of body systems to gather, process, and deliver oxygen.
Four Minute O’Neill Fitness Test
The O’Neill Fitness Test is designed to give a simple and reliable test of aerobic fitness.
After about 10 minutes of familiarization with the Concept2 Indoor Rower, the test can be carried out to get an indication of baseline aerobic fitness by simply comparing the distance covered in four minutes on the chart.
Further regular tests will indicate progress and are suitable for people of all ages and gender.
Test Protocol
Set the monitor on the Concept2 Indoor Rower for four minutes.
Row for four minutes (wind resistance set to ‘3.’)
Look for your age and weight category in the left hand column.
Find your distance covered and check your condition from the row at the top.

Women Excellent Good Above Average Average Below Average
19-29 Lwt 1078 1038 958 878 798
30-39 Lwt 1050 1010 929 849 769
40-49 Lwt 1030 990 909 829 749
50-59 Lwt 1011 971 891 811 730
60-69 Lwt 992 951 871 791 711
70-79 Lwt 973 933 852 772 692
19-29 Hwt 1105 1065 985 905 824
30-39 Hwt 1057 1017 936 856 776
40-49 Hwt 1044 1004 923 843 763
50-59 Hwt 1037 997 917 836 756
60-69 Hwt 1023 983 903 823 743
70-79 Hwt 944 904 823 743 663

Lwt = 61.5Kg or less (9st 9lb)
 
 

Men Excellent Good Above Average Average Below Average
19-29 Lwt 1243 1203 1122 1042 962
30-39 Lwt 1227 1187 1107 1026 946
40-49 Lwt 1208 1168 1087 1007 927
50-59 Lwt 1172 1132 1051 971 891
60-69 Lwt 1131 1091 1011 931 850
70-79 Lwt 1052 1012 931 851 771
80-89 Lwt 953 912 832 752 672
19-29 Hwt 1281 1241 1161 1080 1000
30-39 Hwt 1237 1197 1117 1037 957
40-49 Hwt 1219 1178 1098 1018 938
0-59 Hwt 1182 1142 1062 982 901
60-69 Hwt 1141 1101 1021 940 860
70-79 Hwt 1061 1020 940 860 780
80-89 Hwt 993 953 872 792 712

Lwt = 75Kg or less (11st 11lb)
 
 

Juniors Excellent Good Above Average Average Below Average
Women J12 886 846 766 685 605
Women J13 956 916 835 755 675
Women J14 999 955 885 795 725
Women J15 1042 1001 921 841 761
Women J16 1074 1034 954 874 793
Women J17 1109 1069 988 908 828
Women J18 Lwt 1046 1006 926 846 765
Women J18 Hwt 1100 1060 980 899 819
Men Junior 12 888 848 768 687 607
Men Junior 13 1008 967 887 807 727
Men Junior 14 1095 1055 974 894 814
Men Junior 15 1171 1130 1050 970 890
Men Junior 16 1212 1172 1092 1011 931
Men Junior 17 1251 1211 1130 1050 970
Men Junior 18 Lwt 1221 1180 1100 1020 940
Men Junior 18 Hwt 1281 1241 1161 1081 1000

Lwt = 75Kg or less (11st 11lb)
 
Scoring for CAT Test:

Aerobic Test: O’Neill Test Points
Excellent 10
Very Good 9
Good 8
Above Average 7
Average 6
Below Average 5
Below Average – 100 4
Below Average – 200 3
Below Average – 300 2
Below Average – 400 1

Element#2: Stamina – the ability of body systems to utilize, store, process, and deliver energy.
Test: Tabata Squat and Pushup
For twenty seconds do as many reps of the assigned exercise as you can – then rest 10 seconds.
 Repeat this seven more times for a total of 8 intervals, 4 minutes total exercise.
 The score is the least number of reps for any of the eight intervals.
Start with a bodyweight squat. The athlete’s thighs must reach parallel, as defined in the ‘strength’ category. Arms may either travel in front of the torso or stay on the hips, but must not make contact with the floor or the thigh.
Following 8 rounds of the squat, the athlete has only their normal 10-second break to set up for the pushup.
Scoring: take the lowest number of reps achieved from the 8 sets of squats, and add it to the lowest number of reps achieved from the 8 sets of pushups.
 
Example(using 3 rounds only)
 
Round                                    SQ                   PU
1                               18                   15
2                              17                   16
3                              19                   14
 
The lowest number of reps achieved is 17 in the SQ, and 14 in the PU. Total of 31 reps.
 
Score Chart:

>45 >40 10
40-45 35-39 9
35-39 30-34 8
30-34 25-29 7
25-29 20-24 6
20-24 15-19 5
15-19 10-14 4
10-14 5-9 3
5-9 1-4 2
1-4 0 1
MALE(reps) FEMALE(reps)

 
Element #3: Strength – the ability of a muscular unit, or group of muscular units, to apply force.
*Note: Tests differ for adults and children; between trained and untrained subjects; and across sporting populations. The “CrossFit Total” is a sample used for trained adults.
For children, tests that rely less on learned motor patterns might be more appropriate. Low-skill tasks include static holds (paused pullups or handstands) or holding an external weight in a static position. We do not advocate the use of “wall sits” because static contraction of the knee is irrelevant to sport.
Test: CrossFit Total
Crossfit Total is based on the powerlifting meet template.   Powerlifting meets are set up to maximally test pushing strength, lower-body extension strength, and whole-body pulling strength, using the back squat, bench press, and Deadlift.
Crossfit, though, chooses to use the Press instead of the bench press. The reasons go back to the origins of weightlifting (that is, Olympic Weightlifting,) when there were 3 events: the Clean, the Press, and the Snatch. The Press was dropped from Olympic competition eventually. The Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift were all originally accessory movements to help increase the Clean and Jerk and Snatch. Powerlifting is the ultimate test of those 3 movements. Crossfit Total is a terrific tool for testing the same measure of strength without using the bench press.
The order for performing the three lifts will be squat, press, and then deadlift. The best single attempt for each of the three lifts are added together for the CrossFit Total.
There is no time limit for each lift or for the length of the session in which they are all performed, but they must all be performed during one session—i.e., you cannot leave the area to rest or perform other activities between the three lifts. Multiple progressions to the best attempt are not allowed; do not work up to your best squat, then change an item of equipment or clothing and work up to it again to try to better your first effort.
Squat Rules
The squat must be done from the squat stands or power rack. The bar must be placed on the back and walked out to clear the rack completely. No contact with the rack is permitted until the bar is replaced in the rack. Once the bar is lowered, the stance cannot change until the bar is to be racked. The starting position must be completely upright, with the knees and the hips fully extended and with the chest up. The hips are lowered until the top surfaces of both of the legs at the hip joint are lower than the knees, and then the bar is lifted back up. The bottom position is identified by A) the apex of the crease in the shorts formed as the hips are lowered, B) the surface of the top of the patella, C) the plane formed by a straight line between the two, and D) the dipping of the hip end of that plane below horizontal. The finish position is the same as the starting position, and the athlete must return to it before the bar is racked. When the finish position is secure, the bar must be walked back into the rack and successfully replaced. Any halt in the upward motion of the whole bar, identified at its position on the back rather than at its ends, constitutes a missed attempt, as does any change in position of the feet against the floor during the squat. Any deliberate attempt to lower the bar counts as an attempt. No more than two spotters are permitted, and they are not allowed to touch the bar during the attempt, which is finished only after the bar is successfully replaced in the racks. The spotters are permitted to steady the racks, and to take the bar if the lifter loses control of it. Any touching of either the bar or the lifter by any spotter invalidates the attempt.
Press Rules
The press is also done from the racks. The bar is held in both hands in front of the neck, taken out of the rack and walked back away from the rack. No contact with the rack is permitted until the bar is replaced in the racks. Once the stance is assumed it cannot change until the lift is completed. The starting position must be upright, with the knees and hips fully extended and the chest up. The bar must be in contact with the top of the shoulders or the chest, whichever individual flexibility permits. After the starting position is correctly assumed, the bar is pressed overhead until the elbows are completely extended, with the bar in a position directly above the ears. Once this position has been attained, the bar is lowered back to the front of the shoulders and walked back into the rack and replaced. Any halt in the upward motion of the bar, identified as the part of the bar between the hands, constitutes a missed attempt, as does any change in the position of the feet against the floor during the attempt, any bending of the knees, or excessive backward lean of the torso as identified by A) the position of the most anterior aspect of the armpit, B) the most posterior aspect of the buttocks, C) the plane formed by a straight line between these two points, and D) the movement of that plane to a position behind the vertical. Any deliberate attempt to raise the bar counts as an attempt. Spotters are not permitted for this lift.
Deadlift Rules
The deadlift is performed with the bar on the platform or floor. The lifter assumes a position facing the bar, with the bar parallel to the lifter’s frontal plane. The bar is gripped with both hands, and pulled with one continuous uninterrupted movement until the lifter is standing erect with knees and hips fully extended, the chest up and shoulders back. Once this position is attained and the bar is motionless, the bar is lowered under control with both hands back to the ground. The bar may not be dropped. Any halt in the upward motion of the bar constitutes a missed attempt, as does failure to assume a fully erect position with both knees and hips extended. Any attempt to raise the bar counts as an attempt. The equipment that can be used is minimal. A belt of any type can be worn but is not required. Knee wraps or sleeves are permitted, but if they are used they must be left on for the entire duration of the session in which the lift is performed—e.g., they must be put on before the squat is warmed up and left in place until the last squat attempt is completed. Wrist wraps are permitted; lifting straps are not.
Any type of footwear may be worn, although a formal contest would require an actual shoe of some type. The shirt should be a close-fitting stretch material, like a t-shirt or a golf shirt, tight enough that the back position can be clearly observed during the press. Close-fitting shorts will allow the bottom position in the squat to be observed.
Long pants are not permitted, and neither the shirt nor the shorts can have any supportive characteristics whatsoever. Singlets are not allowed.
The process
Now that we know exactly what we’re doing, we need to figure out the best way to do it. For people not used to doing single maximum attempts, some tips on how best to safely do them are in order. After a warm-up, the squat will be performed first. Some squatting with the empty bar should have been included in the general warm-up so that the knees, hips, back, and shoulders are not too terribly surprised. Anyone in a position to attempt a legitimate CrossFit Total should be familiar enough with their capabilities on the lifts to have a fairly good idea of just what might be possible for a one-rep max (1RM). This number is what you warm up intending to do.   A meet situation will involve three attempts, and this is a good way to determine a true 1RM.
The first attempt would be a weight you know you can do for a heavy set of three. The second attempt would be a weight you know without any doubt that you could do for a single, having just done the first attempt. And the third attempt is the weight you want to do, based on your performance on the previous two attempts. If you have made a mistake setting your first attempt, the next two will need to be adjusted, but you should know what you can triple, and this will always be a safe first attempt. And since you know this weight, you know what weights to use to warm up for it: you’ll use the lightest weight that you normally start with for your first warm-up when you train, and 90% of the first attempt for the last warm-up, with either three or four relatively even increments in between these two. For instance, warm-ups for a 405-pound first attempt on the squat would be:
135 x 5
185 x 3
225 x 2
275 x 1
325 x 1
365 x 1
After the squat, rest a while (long enough to rest, not long enough to get cold) and follow the same procedure with the press. Since press numbers will be much lighter, the warm-ups will be closer together, and you might choose to use fewer intermediate warm-ups. This is fine, since the squat has provided quite a bit of systemic warmup, if not actual fatigue. After a rest and a drink following the press, the deadlift warm-up might be abbreviated even further, with a heavier first warmup and only two or three intermediate sets before the first attempt.
Done correctly, the CrossFit Total is perhaps our best tool for telling us the things we need to know about a very important aspect of fitness: Strength.
 
Scoring:
 

Strength Crossfit Total Points
>1200m/>1000w 10
>1100m/>900w 9
>1000m/>800w 8
>900m/>700w 7
>800m/>600w 6
>700m/>500w 5
>600m/>400w 4
>500m/>300w 3
>400m/>200w 2
>300m/>100w 1



Element #4: Flexibility – the ability to maximize the range of motion at a given joint.
Test: Sum of 5 (2 points available for each. In measuring both arms/legs, take the average of both to determine score, out of a possible 2 points.)
Testees should be shoeless for all of these tests.
Flexibility Test A: Trunk Rotation
The purpose of this flexibility test is to measure trunk and shoulder flexibility, which is important for injury prevention and in particular is important in swimming, racquet sports and throwing sports.
equipmentrequired: wall, a piece of chalk or pencil, ruler or tape measure.
description / procedure: Mark a vertical line on the wall. Stand with your back to the wall directly in front of the line, with your feet shoulder width apart. You should be about arms length away from the wall, though you may need to adjust the distance from the wall once you start the test. Extend your arms out directly in front of you so they are parallel to the floor. Twist your trunk to your right and the touch the wall behind you with your fingertips, keeping your arms extended and parallel to the floor. You are allowed to turn your shoulders, hips and knees as long as your feet don’t move. Mark the position where your fingertips touched the wall, and measure the distance from the line. A point before the line is a negative score and a point after the line is a positive score. Repeat for the left side with your feet in the same position.
scoring: Take the average of the 2 scores (left and right sides). Use the table below to convert the score measurement to a rating.

Ratings Score CAT Score
Excellent 20 cm 2.0
Good 15 cm 1.5
Very Good 10 cm 1.0
Fair 5 cm 0.5
Poor 0 cm 0

Flexibility Test B: Groin
purpose: This simple test measures the flexibility in the adductor muscles.
equipment required: ruler or tape measure.
description / procedure: Sit on the floor with your knees bent, and your feet flat on the floor and legs together. Let your knees drop sideways as far as possible keeping your feet together. The soles of your feet should be together and facing each other. Hold on to your feet with both hands, and pull you ankles as close to your body as possible. Measure the distance from your heels to your groin.
scoring: Use the table below to convert the score measurement to a rating.

Ratings Score CAT Score
Excellent 5 cm 2.0
Good 10 cm 1.5
Very Good 15 cm 1.0
Fair 20 cm 0.5
Poor 25 cm 0

Flexibility Test C: Shoulder
purpose: To test the flexibility of the shoulder joint, which is important for injury prevention and in particular is important in swimming, racquet sports and throwing sports.
description / procedure: Test your left shoulder by standing with your right arm straight up, then bend your elbow so your hand hangs behind your head. Keeping your upper arm stationary, rest your palm between your shoulder blades. Reach around behind you with your left arm so the palm is facing out and try to touch the fingers of both hands together. Reverse the procedure and repeat with the opposite shoulder.
scoring: measure the minimum distance between hands. See the table below for general guidelines for interpreting the results

RANK Specifications CAT Score
Good Fingers are touching 2.0
Fair Fingertips are not touching but are less than two inches apart. 1.0
Poor Fingertips are greater than two inches apart. 0

equipmentrequired: ruler or tape measure.
Flexibility Test D: 90/90 or Active Knee Extension (AKE)
purpose: to assess the range of active knee extension in a position of hip flexion, as required in running and kicking.
equipmentrequired: goniometer with extended arms and spirit level (optional), and a firm table.
description / procedure: The subject lies supine, head back and arms across the chest. The hip is passively flexed until the thigh is vertical (use the spirit level if available). Maintain this thigh position throughout the test, with the opposite leg in a fully extended position. The foot of the leg being tested is kept relaxed, while the leg is actively straightened until the point when the thigh begins to move from the vertical position. The thigh angle at this point is recorded.
 
measurement: measure the minimum angle of knee flexion with the thigh in the vertical position. The measurement unit is degrees. If the leg is able to be fully straightened, the angle would be recorded as 0. Any degree of flexion will be recorded as a positive number, e.g. 10, 20 degrees etc. In cases where the full knee extension is achieved without thigh movement, the knee is flexed and the thigh is moved to 30 degrees past the vertical position, and the knee again straightened. The angle of knee flexion at which the thigh begins to move is again recorded.
 
 

RANK Specifications CAT Score
Great Angle 0 2.0
Good Angle 10 degrees 1.5
Fair Angle 20 degrees 1.0
Sub Angle 30 degrees 0.5
Poor Angle >30 degrees 0

 
Flexibility Test E: Posterior Chain
purpose: to assess the ability of the posterior chain musculature to move and flex as a unit, without a particular muscle group (or group thereof) limiting the unit as a whole.
equipment required: goniometer with extended arms
description / procedure: The subject stands with hands on hips, and descends into a squat position slowly, keeping his heels on the ground (barefoot or sock feet only.) Hip angle is measured at the point where the heels rise from the floor using the goniometer.
 

RANK Specifications CAT Score
Great Angle <45 2.0
Good Angle 45-75 degrees 1.5
Fair Angle 75-90 degrees 1.0
Sub Angle 90-120 degrees 0.5
Poor Angle >120 degrees 0

 
Scoring for CAT Test:

Flexibility SUM of 5 Points
10
Trunk: 9
Groin: 8
Shoulder: 7
AKE: 6
Pos. Chain: + 5
= 4
3
2
1

 
Element #5: Power – the ability of a muscular unit, or combination of muscular units, to apply maximum force in minimum time.
Test: Vertical Jump Test (Sargent Jump)
This procedure describes the method used for directly measuring the height jumped. There are also timing systems that measure the time of the jump and from that calculate the vertical jump height.
equipmentrequired: measuring tape or marked wall, chalk for marking wall (or Vertec or jump mat.)
 
description / procedure (see also variations below): the athlete stands side on to a wall and reaches up with the hand closest to the wall. Keeping the feet flat on the ground, the point of the fingertips is marked or recorded. This is called the standing reach. The athlete then stands away from the wall, and jumps vertically as high as possible using both arms and legs to assist in projecting the body upwards. Attempt to touch the wall at the highest point of the jump. The difference in distance between the standing reach height and the jump height is the score. The best of three attempts is recorded.
scoring: The jump height is usually recorded as a distance score. The table below provides a ranking scale for adult athletes based on my observations, and will give a general idea of what is a good score. For more information, see a selection of vertical jump test results. It is also possible to convert vertical jump height into a power or work score.

rating males (inches) males 
(cm) females (inches) females 
(cm)
excellent > 28 > 70 > 24 > 60
very good 24 – 28 61-70 20 – 24 51-60
above average 20 – 24 51-60 16 – 20 41-50
average 16 – 20 41-50 12 – 16 31-40
below average 12 – 16 31-40 8 – 12 21-30
poor 8 – 12 21-30 4 – 8 11-20
very poor < 8 < 21 < 4 < 11

 
Scoring for CAT Test:

Power Vertical Jump Points
  > 70 > 60 10
61-70 51-60 9
51-60 41-50 8
41-50 31-40 7
31-40 21-30 6
21-30 11-20 5
< 21 < 11 0
MALE(cm) FEMALE(cm) 0
0
0

 
 

Element #6: Speed – the ability to minimize the time cycle of a repeated movement.
Test: The 40 Yard Dash
purpose: The aim of this test is to determine acceleration, and also a reliable indicator of speed, agility and quickness.
equipmentrequired: measuring tape or marked track, stopwatch or timing gates, cone markers, flat and unobstructed grass, track, or turf surface of at least 60 yards.
description / procedure: The test involves running a single maximum sprint over 40 yards, with the time recorded. A thorough warm up should be given, including some practice starts and accelerations. Start from a comfortable stationary 3-point stance position, a position that is most familiar to you and that you think will yield the best time. The front foot must be on or behind the starting line. This starting position should be held for 3 seconds prior to starting, you may lean across the starting line, and no rocking movements are allowed. The tester should provide hints to maximizing speed and encouragement to continue running hard past the finish line.
 

40 yard Sprint Scores 
(general guidelines)
College Footballers 4.6 – 4.9 secs
High School Footballers 4.9 – 5.6 secs
Recreational College athletes (male) ~5.0 secs
Recreational College athletes (female) ~5.8 secs

results: Two trials are allowed, and the best time is recorded to the nearest 2 decimal places. The timing starts from the first movement (if using a stopwatch) or when the timing system is triggered, and finishes when the chest crosses the finish line and/or the finishing timing gate is triggered.
targetpopulation: football and other sports in which speed over that distance is important
comments: 40 yards is 36.58 meters.
 
 
Scoring for CAT Test:

Speed 40yd Dash Points
<4.0 4.1-4.5 10
4.1-4.5 4.6-5.0 9
4.6-5.0 5.1-5.5 8
5.1-5.5 5.6-6.0 7
5.6-6.0 6.1-6.5 6
6.1-6.5 6.6-7.0 5
6.6-7.0 7.1-7.5 4
7.1-7.5 7.6-8.0 3
7.6-8.0 8.1-9.0 2
8.1-9.0 9.1-10.0 1
MALE(s) FEMALE(s)

 
Element #7: Agility – the ability to minimize transition time from one movement to another.
Test: Dot Drill
First conceived by basketball coach Adolph Rupp in the 1940’s, and then later popularized by Bigger Faster Stronger Inc. a few decades later, the dot drill is both a remarkable agility, foot strength, and anaerobic conditioning exercise, as well as a superb and easy-to-administer testing tool.
It is unique in that it creates not only a high level of fatigue, but also a high quality of fatigue, making agility tougher. Agility has also been described as the time necessary to move from one direction of movement to another at full speed; the Dot Drill is nothing more complicated than that.
The dot drill is a battery of 5 separate drills, performed in rapid succession, with each drill performed six times in a row before proceeding to the next drill (please refer to the diagram as you read the description).
 
Dot Drill Schematic
The dot drill features (5), five-inch diameter dots orientated in a pattern similar to the five dots on a pair of dice, expect that the “square” is three feet by two feet. Use a solid surface such as weight room matting, and tie your shoelaces. Tight.
Begin the drill as follows:
Firstdrill: Starting position: your left foot is on “A” and your right foot on “B.” Hop forward and touch “C” with both feet simultaneously, then continue forward so that your left foot lands on “D” at the same instant your right foot lands on “E.” (a total of 2 hops). Now go back to the starting position by reversing what you just did (hopping backward). That’s one rep. Repeat for a total of six reps.
Seconddrill: From the starting position, lift your left foot in the air and with right foot only, hop to “C,” “E,” “D,” “C,” “A,” and back to “B.” That’s one rep. Repeat for a total of six reps.
Thirddrill: Repeat the last drill but using the left foot only (hop to “C,” “E,” “D,” “C,” “A,” and back to “B.”) That’s one rep. Repeat for a total of six reps.
Fourthdrill: Repeat the last drill but using both feet, keeping the feet together- this looks somewhat like a skiing drill. Repeat for a total of six reps.
Fifthdrill: This is very similar to drill number one, with a slight variation: When you reach the top of the pattern (left foot on “D” and your right foot on “E.”), instead of hopping backward to get back to the starting position, you instead jump-spin and land on the same two dots (only now your left foot will be on “E” and your right foot on “D.”), facing the opposite direction. Then hop forward and touch “C” with both feet simultaneously, then continue forward so that your left foot lands on “B” and your right foot on “A.” Lastly, jump-spin again to assume the starting position. That’s one rep. Repeat for a total of six reps.
Errors: Subtract .10 seconds for every missed dot from the total time.
 
TABLE 1
BFS Dot Drill Standards

Agility Dots Drill Points
<40 <45 10
40-44 45-49 9
45-49 50-54 8
50-54 55-59 7
55-59 60-64 6
60-64 65-69 5
65-69 70-74 4
70-74 75-79 3
75-79 80-84 2
80-84 85-90 1
MALE(s) FEMALE(s)


Element #8: Balance – the ability to control the placement of the body’s centre of gravity in relation to its support base.
Test: Stork Balance Stand Test
purpose: To assess the ability to balance on the ball of the foot.
equipment required: flat, non-slip surface, stopwatch, paper and pencil.
description / procedure: Remove the shoes and place the hands on the hips, then position the non-supporting foot against the inside knee of the supporting leg. The subject is given one minute to practice the balance. The subject raises the heel to balance on the ball of the foot. The stopwatch is started as the heel is raised from the floor. The stopwatch is stopped if any of the follow occur:

  • the hand(s) come off the hips
  • the supporting foot swivels or moves (hops) in any direction
  • the non-supporting foot loses contact with the knee.
  • the heel of the supporting foot touches the floor.
Rating Score (seconds) CAT Score
Excellent > 50 10
45-49 9
Good 40-44 8
35-39 7
Average 30-34 6
25-29 5
Fair 20-24 4
15-19 3
Poor 10-14 2
5-9 1

Scoring: The total time in seconds is recorded. The score is the best of three attempts.
 
Test: Accuracy

9: Accuracy – the ability to control movement in a given direction or at a given intensity.
*Note: testing will differ by sport, depending on athlete status. The below is an example for
Test: Sport-specific
Examples: timed free throws, timed target shooting, timed passing drills
 

Element #10: Coordination – the ability to combine several distinct movement patterns into a single movement.
Test: Skipping.
The client performs a simple two-foot skip with a jump rope (leather or vinyl, not cotton.) They’re timed. Any stoppage of the rope results in a stop of the clock. Clients are allowed two attempts.
CAT Score:

Coordination Skipping Points
<10mins 10
9-10mins 9
8-9mins 8
7-8mins 7
6-7mins 6
5-6mins 5
4-5mins 4
3-4mins 3
2-3mins 2
1-2mins 1

 

Aerobic O’Neill Points Stamina Tabata SQ/PU Points
Excellent 10 >45 >40 10
Very Good 9 40-45 35-39 9
Good 8 35-39 30-34 8
Above Average 7 30-34 25-29 7
Average 6 25-29 20-24 6
Below Average 5 20-24 15-19 5
Below Average – 100 4 15-19 10-14 4
Below Average – 200 3 10-14 5-9 3
Below Average – 300 2 5-9 1-4 2
Below Average – 400 1 1-4 0 1
MALE(reps) FEMALE(reps)
Strength Crossfit Total Points Flexibility SUM of 5 Points
>1200m/>1000w 10 10
>1100m/>900w 9 Trunk: 9
>1000m/>800w 8 V-Sit: 8
>900m/>700w 7 Shoulder: 7
>800m/>600w 6 AKE: 6
>700m/>500w 5 Pos. Chain: + 5
>600m/>400w 4 = 4
>500m/>300w 3 3
>400m/>200w 2 2
>300m/>100w 1 1
Power Vertical Jump Points Speed 40yd Dash Points
  > 70 > 60 10 <4.0 4.1-4.5 10
61-70 51-60 9 4.1-4.5 4.6-5.0 9
51-60 41-50 8 4.6-5.0 5.1-5.5 8
41-50 31-40 7 5.1-5.5 5.6-6.0 7
31-40 21-30 6 5.6-6.0 6.1-6.5 6
21-30 11-20 5 6.1-6.5 6.6-7.0 5
< 21 < 11 0 6.6-7.0 7.1-7.5 4
MALE(cm) FEMALE(cm) 0 7.1-7.5 7.6-8.0 3
0 7.6-8.0 8.1-9.0 2
0 8.1-9.0 9.1-10.0 1
MALE(s) FEMALE(s)

 

Coordination Skipping Points Agility Points
 >10mins 10 <40 <45 10
 9-10mins 9 40-44 45-49 9
 8-9mins 8 45-49 50-54 8
 7-8mins 7 50-54 55-59 7
 6-7mins 6 55-59 60-64 6
 5-6mins 5 60-64 65-69 5
 4-5mins 4 65-69 70-74 4
 3-4mins 3 70-74 75-79 3
 2-3mins 2 75-79 80-84 2
 1-2mins 1 80-84 85-90 1
 <1min 0 MALE(s) FEMALE(s)
Balance Stork Test Points Body Composition Points
> 50 10 41-50 50-60 10
45-49 9 51-60 61-70 9
40-44 8 61-70 71-80 8
35-39 7 71-80 81-95 7
30-34 6 81-90 96-110 6
25-29 5 91-100 111-125 5
20-24 4 101-110 126-140 4
15-19 3 111-120 141-155 3
10-14 2 121-130 156-170 2
5-9 1 131-150 171-190 1
0-5 0 MALE(mm) FEMALE(mm)

 

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